The art of saving seeds for the future

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St. Lawrence University students help with a sperm bank burial at the St. Lawrence Living Laboratory near Canton, NY. Photo: Tara Freeman

Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, an artist from St. Lawrence University, and local farmers work together to promote seed-saving ideas and practices. It is part of the Grow and Tell Project, a series of workshops on nutrition, agriculture, and community.

Todd MoeThe art of saving seeds for the future

Rachael Jones' Devonian Coral Fossil Style Seed Bank, which will be buried in the Canton area on Saturday.  Photo provided

Rachael Jones’ Devonian Coral Fossil Style Seed Bank, which will be buried in the Canton area on Saturday. Photo provided

Dan Kelleher, a local farmer, and Rachael Jones, St. Lawrence pottery professor and founder of The Seed Bank Project, will have a discussion on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. about their work on preserving seeds and foods that are of particular concern to the community Region. All are invited to their presentation at LittleGrasse Foodworks, a community farm in the canton. More information is available from TAUNY.

The idea sounds relatively simple: put seeds in a special container, bury them under the permafrost and record their location for a future generation. Jones says it’s a bit like a time capsule in the garden.

Todd Moe spoke to Rachael Jones from SLU and Flip Filippi, co-owner of LittleGrasse Foodworks in Canton.


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